How To Do Philosophy in Public

Steven Campbell-Harris reminds us that some of our attempts at reasoning can miss something.  If a child, or an adult, makes a declarative statement that they claim is true and then attempts to provide reasons or grounds for why that is so, there is a third thing that is needed, the warrant, which is often left as an unstated assumption about why the grounds justify the claim.  How can philosophical enquiry help with getting us out of this lazy way of expressing our ideas? 

Posted by Joe Tyler on 5th June 2018 at 12:00am


Category: Philosophy, P4C, Education

Believers should be glad that proofs for God don’t work

The so-called proofs for the existence of God are widely thought to fail.

Philosophers point out that there is no need for an ‘unmoved mover’, to use Aristotle’s phrase, because modern physics teaches us that motion is natural to matter, not stasis. Alternatively, the ontological argument comes to look like a conjuring trick with words: it is no more the case that God needs to exist because God’s imagined greatness demands it, than it is the case that a perfect island needs to exist because it is described as perfect. Both might be fantasy.

By our Guest Blogger: Mark VernonThe Big Questions: God

Posted by on 21st April 2012 at 12:00am


Category: Guest Blogger

Tags: God, philosophy, Belief